Contemplative Primitive Christian Prayer 8

“Always breathe Christ” ~ Anthony the Great, 4th century

In the ancient Eastern Orthodox contemplative tradition of “hesychasm” (silence, stillness, quietude), invoking the name of Jesus Christ has been used as a means of focusing the mind on God and eliminating outside thoughts, images, and other distractions from pure presence.  Invoking the name of Jesus also acknowledges that God is personal; He only manifests as Persons in Trinity, in an endless “circle dance” (perichoresis) of co-inherent divine love (agape). This invocation of Christ has been combined with breathing as a “psycho-somatic” (involving both “psuche” (soul) and “soma” (body)) aid in centering the spirit (nous) in the heart for its ascent to God.

Athanasius of Alexandria (295 – 356), besides being the hero of the first Ecumenical Council of the Church at Nicaea in AD 325, also wrote “The Life of Anthony”, about the greatest and most celebrated of the first monks.  In it, Athanasius quotes Anthony (whom he personally knew) as follows:

“[Anthony] called his two companions… and said to them, ‘Always breathe Christ’.”

Pseudo-Macarius echoes the same idea in about AD 400 with this elegant sentiment from his “Coptic Cycle of Sayings”:

“The Holy Spirit, the Breath of God, is linked to the Word from all eternity.  Therefore when a person’s intellect and breathing utter the name of the Incarnate Word – Jesus – they are united with the Holy Spirit, and the person breathes and thinks in the Spirit.

The intellect [nous], strengthened by the invocation, finds its connection with the heart again, and this, or rather the presence in it, becomes conscious.  Intellect and heart together form that heart-spirit in which a person collects, opens, unifies, harmonizes, and enlarges himself infinitely.  It properly constitutes the ‘place of God’.”

Anthony and Macarius were joined in this same sentiment more than 200 years later by 7th century mystic master John Climacus.  John wrote the “The Ladder of Divine Ascent”; 30 short tracts, or steps, of spiritual instruction for his monks.  In Step 27 of “The Ladder” he wrote:

“Let your calling to mind of Jesus be continually combined with your breathing and you will know the meaning of silence.”

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  1. #1 by Rick John on June 10, 2014 - 9:14 PM

    Dallas has an amazing intellect. Not unsurpassed by his spiritual depth. His ability to pull the early history of Christianity into relevance today is unparalleled. In fact more than making it relevant it helps us see into the mind and spirit of the. Early Christian believers. Many Christians today want to believe Christianity was invented somewhere in the Deep South in the 1930’s- not my thought but that of Fr Richard Rohr.

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